Sharing stories, personal or not, is a great way to get to know other members, especially as it’s true that people like to do business with people they know and trust.  The time we now allocate to a Storytelling session at each Trading Day provides a valuable opportunity for BrisLETS members to enjoy hearing about each other’s lives, problems, achievements and opinions.

What are your thoughts on this activity?

The secret sauce of Storytelling

“We are hard-wired, as human beings, to fall in love with stories,” according to Chris Do, a dude on YouTube (so it must be true).

“And that’s because we want to learn the lessons they teach without having to suffer, ourselves,” he says.

Our Trading Day Storytelling session started several months ago by Josephine Brown, after encouragement from Alison Bird. Josephine belongs to Cocctales, a similar group that has existed for almost 20 years; she admits she copied its informal set-up, which includes having a different theme for each occasion.

She wanted to provide an entertaining activity for BrisLETS members who came to the Trading Day.

Josephine believes sharing stories is a great way to get to know other members, especially as it’s true that people like to do business with people they know and trust.

The time we now allocate to a Storytelling session at each Trading Day provides a valuable opportunity for BrisLETS members to enjoy hearing about each other’s lives, problems, achievements and opinions.

Space and acoustics important

Some people have a very soft voice; others have ears that don’t work as well as they should.

Holding this session in a smaller space creates a cosy atmosphere, more conducive to sharing stories. And having the benefit of an amplifier and mic means it’s easier for everyone to hear each speaker. (Thanks to Jenn Wallace for lugging the amp to and fro.)

How do you actually build a story?

Josephine says: “During our sessions, I’ve noticed that some people agree to share a story on the theme. And that’s great!

“But they find it a bit difficult to get started … and then find it even harder to stop when their five minutes are up.

“So, if you want to improve your storytelling ability, you could try this: think about your story before you come, write down some bullet-points and decide on your conclusion.

“Ideally, your story will end by showing what you learned, or how you grew.

”Oh, and by the way, it’s okay to read your story, making as much eye contact as possible.”

To pay or not to pay?

Recently, the Management Support Team suggested that participants in BrisLETS Storytelling could show their appreciation or support of this activity by making a token payment of, say, a few Units.

One rationale for this is that ALL BrisLETS workshop presenters should be paid.

Another is that people don’t always value what they get for nothing.

Josephine feels ambivalent.

In general …

  1. What should we stop doing?
  2. What should we keep doing?
  3. What should we start doing?

What do you think? Please respond by 21 February (deadline for NewsLETS) with your ideas to josephinembis@gmail.com

You can also leave a comment below on the website.